Economic Pitfalls and Political Uncertainty in Argentina

Earlier this month, Argentine President Mauricio Macri lost presidential primary elections to opposition candidate Alberto Fernandez, leaving Macri’s chances of winning reelection in doubt. The result came amid high inflation and a struggling economy, which Macri had tried to address using a series of austerity measures.

Pacific Aid and Allegiances

In recent weeks, the Solomon Islands' allegiance to Taiwan appeared shaky as mainland China sought to coax the island nation into its camp. The strategically located Pacific Islands are a soft-power battleground between the U.S. and China; here, we take a closer look at the evolution of aid - a key tool for maintaining allegiances - to these islands between 2011 and 2017.

A Timeline of Tensions in the Persian Gulf

Every day, roughly one-third of the world's seaborne oil flows through the Strait of Hormuz, a chokepoint connecting the Persian Gulf with the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Sea. But mounting tensions threaten to disrupt traffic through the strategic waterway.

Tracking Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America and the Caribbean

How did foreign direct investment in the region change from 2017 to 2018?

The Year in U.S.-Taliban Peace Talks

In our 2019 forecast, we predicted the United States and the Taliban would reach a deal in Afghanistan and that before the end of the year Washington would announce a schedule for withdrawing the bulk of its forces. That forecast seems roughly on track, but the year is only halfway over, and there is a long way to go.

Tracking African Swine Fever

African swine fever is an infectious disease that has already spread from Africa to Europe and Asia. The current outbreak has led to more than 1 million pigs being culled in China.

Top Container Ship Trade Routes

Dec. 16, 2016 China has been working on a plan to modernize the legendary Silk Road. The two-part initiative called One Belt, One Road includes both land and sea routes and the opening of multiple economic corridors, spanning an area that covers almost two-thirds of the world’s population and a third of global GDP. Linking Eurasia together will require the construction of roads, railways, ports and other elements across vast distances in some of the harshest terrain and least populated areas in the world.

Colonial Powers in Sub-Saharan Africa

June 4, 2016 European powers strongly shaped the geopolitics of contemporary sub-Saharan Africa. In the colonial era, they saw sub-Saharan Africa as a means to an end, initially encountering the continent as they looked for sea trading routes to India and East Asia. France, Great Britain, Portugal, Germany and Belgium had the largest presence.

From the 16th century through the 18th century, major European governments established ports to support long voyages to the East Indies. When we look at the location of former colonies, we can observe how each location served as a resting and refueling point in the long journey east.

Global Military Spending Soars

A new report shows that global military spending reached a new post-Cold War high last year.

The Polar Silk Road: China Comes to Greenland

China is investing in Greenland, and it’s making the U.S. nervous.

Ottoman Empire Borders Versus Modern-Day Borders

May 3, 2016 This map is designed to show some of the hidden fault lines underlying the states of the Middle East, and the reasons these states, which were held together by foreign powers and domestic tyrants, disintegrated.

The Ottoman Empire lasted for about six centuries before it collapsed after World War I. Towards the waning years of the 17th century, its forces had penetrated as far west as Vienna. Its power and reach were enormous and enduring. The green areas of the map show what remained of the empire in the mid-19th century, after it was long past its prime. Its power had declined, but the extent of its rule, even in decline, bound together a region reaching from the Balkans to the Arabian Peninsula and to a large part of North Africa.

Why Korea Can’t Replicate Germany’s Reunification

It has made geopolitical sense since their establishment in 1948 for North and South Korea to find a way to get along and tap into their joint potential, and yet they haven’t, because peaceful reunification is exceedingly difficult to achieve.